Carbon Emissions of Line Marking | White Paper

Line marking is a fundamental part of transport systems helping to manage traffic flow and maintain road safety. The UK government has set an ambitious target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Line marking plays a role in supporting the infrastructure sector to achieve this goal.

THE CARBON EMISSIONS OF LINE MARKING

This white paper examines the carbon footprint associated with various line marking systems.

Showing the potential for carbon reduction based on a comparison of hot thermoplastic line marking application and cold applied line marking systems.

REQUEST WHITE PAPER

DECARBONISATION OF LINE MARKING EMISSIONS

THERMOPLASTIC MARKING

Thermoplastic Road Markings (TRMs) are used on more than 95% of public roads in the UK since the 1950s. The high use of TRM’s for line marking public roads represents a significant carbon output. This is because TRM’s are typically applied using a heavy- duty class 8 support truck.

The system also requires heating and agitation of the material before application onto the road. The material also has to be maintained at a constant temperature throughout the line marking shift.

COLD APPLIED MARKING

Cold applied line marking offer a high- performance alternative to systems such as thermoplastic line marking. Cold applied systems include; Methyl Methacrylate (MMA) cold plastics, and solvent or water based acrylics.

These systems do not require heating during the line marking process and they can be transported by LCVs. The cold paints can be applied with a range of modern, efficient equipment, reducing wastage of product. They can also be battery powered.

EXPLORING CARBON EMISSIONS...

This study was verified by Avieco on behalf of Meon. The study was carried out independently from Meon by the University of Alberta, Canada, drawing on industry insight, scientific research and product specifications. The study is further endorsed by Blue Symmetry, a leading UK Consultancy.